Is Divorce Actually Common After the Holidays?

Posted on December 29th, 2021 in Divorce, Family Law

It’s common to hear about couples divorcing after the holidays, but is it really as common as people think? Actually, there is some truth to this. Julie Brines and Brian Serafini of the University of Washington analyzed the last 15 years of divorce filings, to find that while January wasn’t the highest month of the year for post-holiday divorce, it was the common time for the rise in divorce filings. February, in fact, is where divorce filings peak.

So while couples aren’t walking into divorce court to file their papers at the start of the new year, they are contacting lawyers and preparing to do so. When there’s an influx of divorce filings, law firms and local courts in the Scranton and Northeastern Pennsylvania area will be affected. How divorcing couples should proceed and how they are affected are questions Kalinoski Law Offices can help answer.

Is it a Good Idea to Divorce After the Holidays?

Putting off filing for divorce is usually never a good idea. A spouse knows when their marriage is over, and waiting can only allow the marital assets you need to divide to grow. At the same time, it can allow things to become uncomfortable in your home, so the solution isn’t to wait out all the post-holiday divorce filings.

Speaking of marital assets, while it may not seem like the best time for the busy law firms and courts, it can be easier for the divorcing couples in question. After the holidays, a couple’s finances and marital assets should be well defined and stable for months to come. It’s common for a couple to spend a large amount of money for the holidays and likely receive bonuses from their employment. After this large coming and going of money, your finances should settle. This will allow you to understand and prepare for something as costly as a divorce.

Emotional and financial stability aside, there is also the concern of a divorcing couple’s children. Children have a lot to do with January and February, but the summer months also see an influx of divorce filings. They are the two best times of the year for them to make the transition. During the summer, they are off from school and can be with their family to understand the situation. Before the holidays, a divorce can ruin what should be a time for making happy memories with the family. So after all the holiday celebrating is done, it can be a better time to divorce when there are children involved.

Does the Influx in Filings Affect Court Proceedings?

Local courts have been processing divorces for years, and those working likely know better than anyone else that the time after the holidays is busy for divorce. While there may be more court proceedings than usual, there is rarely news of a slowdown or delay in proceedings. If you’re filing for divorce in January, you will have your day in court.

Law firms are another matter. Law firms have a limit to how many people they can represent, so it’s best to contact an attorney as soon as possible. At the same time, you want to be careful not to hire an attorney who is encumbered with clients filing their post-holiday divorces. It’s important to find an attorney dedicated to getting you and your family the best possible outcome and focused on setting you and your family up for post-divorce life.

Craig Kalinoski is the Scranton Divorce Attorney You Need

In your search for an attorney who can help you begin the divorce filing process, you should look for someone who doesn’t buckle under pressure or take on more than they can handle. That’s Lifetime Lawyer Craig Kalinoski. With years of experience in representing people in divorce and other aspects like child custody, child support, and spousal support, he’s one you can trust.

Contact Kalinoski Law Offices for consultation. Talk to an attorney who’s more than able to handle the post-holiday rush of divorces coming in.

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